Archive for January, 2010

Event: On the Road to $200 Oil?

Tuesday, January 26th, 2010

At the New America Foundation tomorrow: http://www.newamerica.net/events/2010/driving_oil_policy.  Appears to be an interesting discussion, accompanied by the official think tank box lunch.  Sandwich, chips, apple and cookie usually.  Sometimes a pasta salad instead of the chips.

Are there policy events in Washington, DC that you would like to attend, but cannot?  I will go in your place,  provide you a written report and summary, and a 30 minute phone conversation to discuss the event and the policy implications for  your particular interest.  All for a flat rate fee.  This does not include any registration fees, but most policy seminars such as this one are free.

HEK

New Policy Organization: CSCEM

Monday, January 4th, 2010

My good friend Ken Malloy has started another policy organization, the Center for the  Study of Carbon and Energy Markets (http://www.energymarkets.org).  I am probably not as idealistic as Ken, who states,  “In order to preserve credibility and independence, the Center does not accept contributions from government sources, or from energy or environmental companies, law firms or consulting firms that represent them, nor trade associations.  We seek funding from foundations that support research and educational programs concerning free markets and democratic processes and principles, and by tax deductible contributions from private citizens.”

I am not the free market purist he is either, and I have never been a Reaganite, as he describes himself.  However,  I do believe in markets if competition can lead to innovation and efficiency, and there are effective and enforced rules of the game established by government and/or private organizations.  Most of all, I appreciate his stand against  “energy independence,” which anyone who really understands energy markets, knows is nonsense.  Humans trade.  We have done so for millennia and will continue to do so.  While it is prudent to stockpile oil for security purposes, as we do in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, pretending we can produce all the energy we need in the USA if only we follow policies A, B and C (which vary according to the ideology or interest of the speaker),  merely distracts us from obtaining and using resources wisely.

May your endeavors bear fruit, Ken.  And have fun along the way.

HEK